© Copyright 2015, Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS, All Rights Reserved
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Retainers

About Retainers

A retainer is a custom-made orthodontic appliances designed to "retain" or hold the position of your teeth. Once your braces come off, your teeth need to settle into the jawbone and soft tissue that hold them in place. Made of wire and plastic or solid plastic, your custom- made retainer will keep your teeth from shifting and protect your investment in orthodontics! As you age, your teeth tend to shift. Your retainer will also help control this naturally occurring, age-related shifting. Wearing your retainer exactly as instructed is the best insurance that your orthodontic treatment results last a lifetime.

Are Retainers Comfortable?

When you wear your retainers, certain teeth may feel pressure and might even feel sore once in a while. If you experience this temporary discomfort, don't worry — it's completely normal. The more your wear it, the more comfortable it will be.

How Long Should Retainers be Worn?

Dr. Davis monitors patients wearing retainers for approximately one year. During that time he will advise about full-time or part-time wear, monitor stability of the teeth, as well as monitor growth and development of wisdom teeth, if appropriate. After one year, wearing your retainers just at night while you sleep is a good practice.

Types of Retainers

Hawley Retainers

The most common type of retainer, Hawley retainers have a design that consists of wires and clasps embedded in a relatively thick plastic body that covers over the roof of the your mouth or lies along the tongue side of your lower teeth. The clasps grasp selected teeth so the retainer is anchored securely. The retaining "bow" wire arches across the front side of the your teeth and holds and maintains their alignment. Clear Retainers These retainers are clear plastic vacuum-formed appliances that are made by taking a cast of your teeth. They are less noticeable and more comfortable than Hawley retainers.

Fixed Retainers

Fixed retainers are also referred to as "bonded" or "permanent" retainers. And, as each of these names suggest, these types of appliances are attached (bonded) directly to the backsides of the front teeth (3 teeth left of center and 3 right of center). Fixed retainers do not touch or hold the back teeth because it's not possible to have a wire go round the entire mouth. Thus, the back teeth may move over time. Because of the increased potential for cavities and gum problems, these retainers have become less popular with dental professionals.

Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS

Board Certified Orthodontist

400 N Broadway

Escondido, CA 92025

(760) 781-1086

© Copyright 2015, Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS, All Rights Reserved
Tap for Menu

Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS

Board Certified Orthodontist

400 N Broadway

Escondido, CA 92025

(760) 781-1086

Retainers

About Retainers

A retainer is a custom-made orthodontic appliances designed to "retain" or hold the position of your teeth. Once your braces come off, your teeth need to settle into the jawbone and soft tissue that hold them in place. Made of wire and plastic or solid plastic, your custom-made retainer will keep your teeth from shifting and protect your investment in orthodontics! As you age, your teeth tend to shift. Your retainer will also help control this naturally occurring, age-related shifting. Wearing your retainer exactly as instructed is the best insurance that your orthodontic treatment results last a lifetime.

Are Retainers Comfortable?

When you wear your retainers, certain teeth may feel pressure and might even feel sore once in a while. If you experience this temporary discomfort, don't worry — it's completely normal. The more your wear it, the more comfortable it will be.

How Long Should Retainers be

Worn?

Dr. Davis monitors patients wearing retainers for approximately one year. During that time he will advise about full-time or part-time wear, monitor stability of the teeth, as well as monitor growth and development of wisdom teeth, if appropriate. After one year, wearing your retainers just at night while you sleep is a good practice.

Types of Retainers

Hawley Retainers

The most common type of retainer, Hawley retainers have a design that consists of wires and clasps embedded in a relatively thick plastic body that covers over the roof of the your mouth or lies along the tongue side of your lower teeth. The clasps grasp selected teeth so the retainer is anchored securely. The retaining "bow" wire arches across the front side of the your teeth and holds and maintains their alignment. Clear Retainers These retainers are clear plastic vacuum- formed appliances that are made by taking a cast of your teeth. They are less noticeable and more comfortable than Hawley retainers.

Fixed Retainers

Fixed retainers are also referred to as "bonded" or "permanent" retainers. And, as each of these names suggest, these types of appliances are attached (bonded) directly to the backsides of the front teeth (3 teeth left of center and 3 right of center). Fixed retainers do not touch or hold the back teeth because it's not possible to have a wire go round the entire mouth. Thus, the back teeth may move over time. Because of the increased potential for cavities and gum problems, these retainers have become less popular with dental professionals.
© Copyright 2015, Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS, All Rights Reserved
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Allen G. Davis, DDS, MS

Board Certified Orthodontist

400 N Broadway

Escondido, CA 92025

(760) 781-1086

Retainers

About Retainers

A retainer is a custom-made orthodontic appliances designed to "retain" or hold the position of your teeth. Once your braces come off, your teeth need to settle into the jawbone and soft tissue that hold them in place. Made of wire and plastic or solid plastic, your custom-made retainer will keep your teeth from shifting and protect your investment in orthodontics! As you age, your teeth tend to shift. Your retainer will also help control this naturally occurring, age-related shifting. Wearing your retainer exactly as instructed is the best insurance that your orthodontic treatment results last a lifetime.

Are Retainers Comfortable?

When you wear your retainers, certain teeth may feel pressure and might even feel sore once in a while. If you experience this temporary discomfort, don't worry — it's completely normal. The more your wear it, the more comfortable it will be.

How Long Should Retainers be Worn?

Dr. Davis monitors patients wearing retainers for approximately one year. During that time he will advise about full-time or part-time wear, monitor stability of the teeth, as well as monitor growth and development of wisdom teeth, if appropriate. After one year, wearing your retainers just at night while you sleep is a good practice.

Types of Retainers

Hawley Retainers

The most common type of retainer, Hawley retainers have a design that consists of wires and clasps embedded in a relatively thick plastic body that covers over the roof of the your mouth or lies along the tongue side of your lower teeth. The clasps grasp selected teeth so the retainer is anchored securely. The retaining "bow" wire arches across the front side of the your teeth and holds and maintains their alignment. Clear Retainers These retainers are clear plastic vacuum-formed appliances that are made by taking a cast of your teeth. They are less noticeable and more comfortable than Hawley retainers.

Fixed Retainers

Fixed retainers are also referred to as "bonded" or "permanent" retainers. And, as each of these names suggest, these types of appliances are attached (bonded) directly to the backsides of the front teeth (3 teeth left of center and 3 right of center). Fixed retainers do not touch or hold the back teeth because it's not possible to have a wire go round the entire mouth. Thus, the back teeth may move over time. Because of the increased potential for cavities and gum problems, these retainers have become less popular with dental professionals.